Paid cheerleaders: Does Royal Caribbean’s viral campaign cross the line?

Posted by Anita Dunham-Potter On March - 6 - 2009

Talk about a royal mess.

In early 2007, Royal Caribbean developed a marketing strategy that used online bulletin boards to spread the cruise line’s gospel, so to speak. The company created a program, dubbed “Royal Champions,” that enlisted rabid Royal Caribbean fans who happened to be frequent posters on Internet cruise bulletin boards like Cruise Critic.

Did its program cross the line?

I spoke to Harrison Liu, manager brand communications for Royal Caribbean International, about the Royal Champion program. “Royal Champions are enthusiastic online supporters of Royal Caribbean who remain independent and share their opinions as they see fit,” said Harrison. He is quick to point out that the Royal Champion program is separate from the Crown & Anchor Society program – the line’s loyalty program for customers.

Harrison said that the selection criteria, responsibilities and benefits of Royal Champions are confidential in order to ensure the maximum level of objectivity among the group. He added that invitation to become a Royal Champion does not take into account of how many cruises one has taken, nor with which ship they sailed.

Paid cheerleaders

But a recent blog post on marketing site Customer Insight Group revealed more insight into the program than Royal Caribbean disclosed in the interview.

The post cites how the cruise line worked with Nielsen Buzz Metrics to “identify enthusiastic online supporters of Royal Caribbean.” By utilizing a “complex formula of data mining” the cruise line identified fifty posters a Royal Champions gig. The article details how the fifty individuals were chosen for the “quality and quantity” of their posts with a number having over 10,000 message board posts about Royal Caribbean. The majority of posts were found on Cruise Critic. After individuals were chosen for the program, their posts were “carefully monitored during events and on a regular basis to ensure that posts remain positive and frequent.”

The post also states that Royal Champions were rewarded with all-expense paid pre-inaugural sailings along with invites to events and cocktail parties hosted by Royal Caribbean executives.

Friend or faux?

The Customer Insight Group blog post made its way to the Cruise Critic boards where it has irked many of the line’s most loyal customers.

For the uninitiated, message boards feature comments posted by individuals using made-up online names used to preserve their anonymity. Since Royal Champions are not identified when they post many feel the lack of transparency and the fact that free cruises are given as an incentive to post is wrong.

“Very clever program with nice perks,” writes poster CanTex. “We need to be cautious about the objectivity of postings by the Champions.”

“The Royal Champion program has influenced me, it has made me start to look at other cruise lines,” says poster alexkrn46.

“Cruise Critic has so many travel agents, Royal Champions, and cheerleaders it’s hard to get a really neutral opinion or review of cruising. When people express their feelings and it isn’t all warm and fuzzy to Royal Caribbean they get attacked as jealous or whiny or worse,” writes cruisePRN.

On the other hand, the majority of posters on the Royal Caribbean board say they don’t mind the Royal Champion program. A number of Royal Champions have come out in the open like Cruiserccl, who at the ripe age of 14, professes that program hasn’t changed his posting habits.

I contacted Laura Sterling, Cruise Critic’s community manager about the Royal Champion program. She did not reply to my e-mails. However, she did write a general post to all board readers regarding the Royal Champion program where she says the program is for “influencing others who are not customers to sail on Royal Caribbean.” She adds, “It’s the new trend on the Web, and it will be here to stay. It’s the reason our site is so popular. The consumer voice sells product.”

To be sure, there are some shades of gray in between what consumer voice is heard. In the Customer Insight Group blog post a Royal Caribbean executive says that posts from Royal Champions are “carefully monitored during events and on a regular basis to ensure that posts remain positive and frequent.” The executive noted that due to the “ample word of mouth and exert sufficient influence” the investment in the Royal Champion program has been “worthwhile.”

That leaves a number of questions. Can you believe what is posted? Is the poster a genuine fan or someone who is being coerced to post only plentiful positive news? Lastly, does a forum cease becoming neutral territory for users when it allows an outside corporation to use members for marketing purposes?

Viral can get vicious

Sadly, exuberance of a cruise line can come at a moral price when a mob of fans disagrees with a reader’s post. This brings us to the infamous case of Brenda Moran, the passenger that was banned from Royal Caribbean for life due to abundant negative cruise reviews about her voyages on Cruise Critic.

I spoke to Moran about the Royal Champion program and she says several members from the group have been her harshest critics over the years. A few even sent nasty e-mails, and she believes some even went further with phone calls to her home, though she doesn’t have proof of that. She firmly believes it was the Royal Champion group that fought so hard to get her banned from the cruise line.

After writing Moran’s story last May, I, too, was not immune to hundreds of negative blog comments and e-mails about my reporting of her story. The sheer number of negative commentary on this story made me wonder if it was indeed coordinated. There were a number of posts that were similar in content and style to e-mails that I received. Upon checking IP addresses (a number that is assigned to a computer by an Internet service provider to be its permanent address on the Internet) I was able to match a number of nasty blog posts on ExpertCruiser to e-mails sent to me by two members that identified themselves as Royal Champions.

I was unaware of the Royal Champion program until another Cruise Critic poster, critical of the program, e-mailed me. I contacted Royal Caribbean about it last summer – it had no comment. I have to wonder why Royal Caribbean is taking such a big risk using online forums. After all, it has some of the most beautiful, innovative cruise ships in the industry and has an amazing fan base that posts good things, regardless.

Like them or not, online cruise message boards are now part of the pool of intelligence gathering and rumor swapping used (and manipulated) by travel agents, cruise line employees, rabid cruise fans, investors, media and the curious to track the performance of a cruise line.

You’ve been warned.

Filled Under Advice, Tripblog, What's New?

39 Responses

  1. Anne Said,

    Terrific reporting, Anita!

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 11:24 am

  2. Alastair McKenzie Said,

    No surprises here. I call them “pyjama men” ( see http://tinyurl.com/64v7q5 ). I think you’ve barely scratched the surface.

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 12:56 pm

  3. Dave Said,

    Excellent article, Anita. RCI using a 14 year old as a shill? Amazing.

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 1:07 pm

  4. Anne Said,

    Hopefully the majority of people who own message boards have the integrity to tell visitors when a glowing, positive post is the result is the result of someone being paid by a cruise line. This is like running a commerical and saying it’s a documentary. Any cruise line can attempt to influence the public this way but I have to believe the majority of web sites have more honesty than to allow it.

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 1:09 pm

  5. Andrea M. Rotondo Said,

    Very insightful article! Thanks for digging to find out more about this.

    I like to hear the good, the bad, and the truly ugly about cruise lines and I’ve come to expect that on message boards. You’ve reminded me that I’m being naive.

    Many companies are using this type of viral marketing technique. I recently heard about some thirtysomethings that have been hired to sit on bar stools throughout Manhattan talking about how great vodka brand X is.

    Moral of the story? I guess we have to question the motive of anyone who posts 100% positive reviews on a more-than-regular basis. I don’t know many travelers who are always 100% happy with their cruise line.

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 1:31 pm

  6. Snoozeman Said,

    Great article and very enlightening. Thank you very much!

    I knew there was a clandestine program of some type, but had no idea it was so well coordinated and organized. It is amazing, and it explains a few contacts I have received concerning some reviews on my little blog. One while on board ship last year. Does it cross the line? Probably not, but it is close.

    Of course Cruise Critic and Royal Caribbean have long had a relationship beyond this campaign. I lean towards another online cruise site, CruiseMates, but newbie cruisers can learn a lot on both websites. One needs to be aware though.

    Thanks again. Great reporting!

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 1:55 pm

  7. Al Said,

    Why focus on the website where cruisers post? That’s a sideways approach. The sites where these “influencers” are posting has nothing to do with the marketing approach taken by Royal Caribbean.

    Let’s face it, I participate on three different cruise sites and none of them give two darn farts who I am when I register and don’t ask me if I “love” or “hate” any cruise line when I do.

    Also, doesn’t it make SENSE that a community of people who like to cruise, well, would ATTRACT a group of people that like to cruise?

    Geez, stretch it some more, will ya.

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 2:49 pm

  8. Paul Motter Said,

    I have been struggling with this all day. I feel compelled to comment because some people might think this could also be happening in CruiseMates. With apologies to the editorial staff at Cruise Critic, who I see often and have no personal problems with, I feel I have to say this:

    I have known about this program from Royal Caribbean for awhile, however, I just learned that this is being done with the knowledge of the web site in the article.

    While I don’t approve of the method I don’t fully blame the cruise line for trying this since many people try to maximize their exposure in message boards as much as they can, but I would approach it a different way.

    If I were asked I would say:

    “I would welcome any cruise line representative coming into our web site in an official capacity to give our readers specific information about your ships, since information is one reason our forums exist. However, the other reason they exist is for the unbiased and unsolicited opinions of our readers. I can in no way condone people posting “frequently and positively” about any product in the guise of mere satisfied customers when they are in fact receiving compensation”

    Even television commercials that use actors playing real people show a disclaimer that says “these are paid endorsements.”

    I heartily disagree with the comment reported in this article that “this is the new trend on the Internet and it will be here to stay.” My position is that it is not a trend as this is the first web site I have ever heard of condoning it, and if I have anything to say about it, it will never become even marginally accepted, let alone a trend.

    Advertising is one thing. Editorial is another. Our forums are for unsolicited, honest personal opinions written by impartial real people. CruiseMates does not allow any undisclosed solicitations for any product if they stand to profit from making those posts. When Cruisemates detects such an imposter we delete the message and warn them not to do it again. If they continue we ban them.

    On very, very rare occasions we have allowed people to post about a new web site or travel related product they may have – but we ask them to fully disclose who they are in the message. As stated, even this is a very rare occurence in Cruisemates and we have limited it to just a few clearly designated messages at most. I doubt you could find even one such message in our forums today.

    This has always been our policy as any CruiseMates staff member will tell you.

    Posted on March 6th, 2009 at 3:41 pm

  9. Sammy Said,

    Hi Anita, I just stumble upon your blog, I really enjoy the post, even though there are some of things that I’m not familiar with, but I really enjoy reading it.

    Posted on March 8th, 2009 at 12:42 am

  10. Paul Motter Said,

    There is indeed a great deal of this viral marketing happening, to the point where the FTC felt compelled to rule on it. They ruled that no one, including the people sitting on barstools or in social media sites, should ever engage in this without disclosing they are being compensated for what they do:

    http://www.ftc.gov/os/closings/staff/061211staffopiniontocommercialalert.pdf

    Furthermore, it has been illegal in the UK and European Union as well:

    http://www.marketingvox.com/fake-blogging-consumer-reviews-to-become-illegal-in-uk-027203/

    http://www.schillings.co.uk/Display.aspx?MasterId=3411b499-412c-4dc1-989d-717ef1fcdecd&NavigationId=0

    The article above says in reference to the British law:

    “The law is “strict liability” which means it doesn’t matter if the company didn’t intend to break it or were only negligent: as always ignorance is no defence. Given that the maximum penalties for a breach of these rules include a two-year prison sentence (seriously!) it’s probably best to get this one right. The important thing is to make sure that all postings are accompanied by a sufficient disclaimer, like the conflict-of-interest disclosures that (proper) journalists slip into their articles.”

    This article, “Fake Bloggers soon to be Named and Shamed”

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article1361968.ece

    says that Britain actually has a law against people “falsely representing oneself as a consumer” in online web sites. The article cites Amazon and TripAdvisor as two Web sites where such behavior has been discovered.

    It is possible laws have changed since these articles came out in 2006. I just know that I couldn’t find anything to refute these articles.

    Posted on March 8th, 2009 at 2:26 am

  11. Royal Caribbean Shame On You « “BIG” ED KONEFE Said,

    Posted on March 8th, 2009 at 10:39 pm

  12. BIG ED KONEFE Said,

    The is a real underhanded way to get people to say anything positive about RCL. Us that cruise with CARNIVAL are pround to say how much we enjoy sailing with CARNIVAL without rewards.

    Posted on March 9th, 2009 at 7:13 am

  13. Dub Taylor Said,

    Today I have watched several posts critical of the Royal Champions/Commandos get deleted from cruisecritic.com. They have effectively turned the Royal Caribbean Board on Cruise Critic into an on-line police state where any criticism will be removed. There is an ongoing discussion on CruiseMates.com about it – far enough away that hopefully the Royal Commandos influence cannot be felt:

    http://www.cruisemates.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=606992

    Posted on March 9th, 2009 at 2:23 pm

  14. Lisa Said,

    RCCL should be ashamed of themselves, as should Cruise Critic, I wonder how much the Travel Agents and the Management of Cruise Critic benefited from this?

    It puts Crusie Critic and The Travel Agents integrity into question.

    Posted on March 10th, 2009 at 8:11 am

  15. Bernie’s Transportation Communications Newsletter - March 10, 2009 | Transport Gooru Said,

    Posted on March 10th, 2009 at 5:06 pm

  16. JMPhil Said,

    Why do those who love cruising find themselves trashed on this site as “rabid cruise fans?” If the person running it isn’t a fan of cruising, then why is she an “expert cruiser?” I’m not a “rabid” fan of anything — “rabid” means disease-ridden and disease-causing. But people who like cruising as a vacation style aren’t any more deserving of being trashed than those who enjoy going to Nascar events over vacations, or to Broadway plays.

    Note, I’m not a Challenger, or Champion, or whatever RCI’s paying now — I enjoyed my RCI cruise, but they think their product is worth WAY more than I do…. they aren’t actually so all that compared to the other lines.

    Guess I’m just wondering why anyone who makes a living “off” the cruiselines (one way or another) — reviewing ‘em, challenging them as a problem-solver, etc) would decide to slam those who just think cruising’s a great vacation style?

    Posted on March 10th, 2009 at 6:43 pm

  17. Royal Caribbean's Brand Evangelist Loyalty Program: Erroneous or Brilliant? » techipedia | tamar weinberg Said,

    [...] firsthand how much I eat, drink, and sleep social media, pointed me to an interesting critique by ExpertCruiser on a 2007 social media marketing campaign by Royal Caribbean.  That year, the cruise line launched [...]

    Posted on March 12th, 2009 at 8:58 am

  18. terry@charlotte real estate Said,

    I think we’ll see more and more of this. I’m out here all the time, and I’ve seen posts so enthusiastic that I’ve often wondered… but there is blowback,and between Titter and Facebook, you have to look forward to the next company that tries this.

    Posted on March 12th, 2009 at 7:05 pm

  19. tripso.com | A contagious virus: Marketing campaign sinks Cruise Critic Said,

    [...] clarity Royal Caribbean contacted me to clarify my article regarding the Royal Champion program. I spoke to Bill Hayden, associate vice president of marketing for Royal Caribbean International. [...]

    Posted on March 13th, 2009 at 5:06 am

  20. Cruisemates Blog » Is Royal Caribbean Trying to Swim Upstream? - Kuki Said,

    [...] 2007, establishing a viral marketing campaign at work on several Internet Message Boards called “The Royal Champions”; as first brought to the forefront by Anita Dunham Potter on MSNBC.com – with follow ups other [...]

    Posted on April 1st, 2009 at 8:39 am

  21. Marina I Said,

    I am really surprised people are surprised by the paid posts. I live in St Petersburg Russia where there are hundreds of cruise ships bringing about 600,000 passengers arriving each summer. There are many posts by enthusiastic fans of tour operators convincing people to use the services of certain tour operators, most of whom did not even exist, and are still not legal entities when the poster claims to have had the best shore excursion of their life. These posts work so they dominate most forums but anyone familiar with the personalities and nature of the industry can spot those unlikely posts in a second. Cruise Critic does police the boards but only selectively so they miss 90% of those fake posts or even allow them based on their own arrangements with cruise lines, and shore providers. Aware consumers need to be much more critical of advice and ask much tougher questions.
    I used to work in a tour operator that used Cruise Critic for its unpaid advertising, they had dozens of fake accounts and often created threads where most of the posts were only the owner’s own under 10 different names. Within a few months the “general knowledge” about this tiny company of 3 people had generated a reputation stretching back several years yet the company was only 4 months old and still not licensed. Now due to those bogus posts they have a lot of clients and are usually listed as one of the larger reputable service providers. They had no office, not cars/vans and no insurance or licenses. Based on that success in forum marketing a dozen others are doing the same thing this year.

    A lot of Cruisers are very gullible and will join the bandwagon without asking any questions. They repeat the stories without thinking how little they know as to the identity of the poster or the destinations. On the web small tour providers can appear as large and established as an actual established operator. Here the key issue is licensing and insurance. As far as I know only 3 companies out of dozens hold internationally recognized liability insurance. Therefore only those 3 are eligible for bidding on cruise line contracts to provide the shore excursions the ships sell. They need a local operator to sponsor their passengers for visa free entry into the country.
    The industry will never improve or get more professional, reliable or safer until cruisers start asking tougher questions and base their decisions on the facts., Currently most people book shore excursions solely on enthusiastic recommendations from nameless posters, and whether the guide smiled a lot.

    Cruise lines do NOT generally cover their passengers with liability insurance when off the ship so they require their shore contractors to have it. That is reasonable but why do cruisers not care whether their are risking so much far from home by not even asking about these things?
    As for posts, ignore posts from “people” who only post touting one service and no general posts, ignore those which have glowing reports as their first and only posts, ignore posts that not give detailed verifiable reasons they are promoting a particular company. Ignore posts from single issue “experts” with thousands of posts most of which promote one cruise or one shore excursion operator, they are most certainly shills but they get a pass because they post so often for years. One has 6,000 posts and in every one of them they promote a single tour operator yet none of his posts are blocked. With each of these, the odds are very great that the post is fake and used in place of traditional advertising.

    This is how it is in this one specific region so you can imagine how widespread it is when the much larger sums of money are at stake with whole cruise lines or major destinations.

    Posted on June 9th, 2009 at 5:54 am

  22. sıcak video Said,

    The is a real underhanded way to get people to say anything positive about RCL. Us that cruise with CARNIVAL are pround to say how much we enjoy sailing with CARNIVAL without rewards.

    Posted on June 17th, 2009 at 7:51 am

  23. sedat Said,

    RCCL should be ashamed of themselves, as should Cruise Critic, I wonder how much the Travel Agents and the Management of Cruise Critic benefited from this?

    It puts Crusie Critic and The Travel Agents integrity into question.

    Posted on June 19th, 2009 at 3:36 pm

  24. oyun oyna Said,

    Many companies are using this type of viral marketing technique. I recently heard about some thirtysomethings that have been hired to sit on bar stools throughout Manhattan talking about how great vodka brand X is.

    Posted on June 19th, 2009 at 3:36 pm

  25. Birkaç dofollow blog backlink için link « Rapid Center - Free & Unlimited Paylaşım Said,

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    Posted on June 19th, 2009 at 6:14 pm

  26. porno Said,

    Cruise lines do NOT generally cover their passengers with liability insurance when off the ship so they require their shore contractors to have it. That is reasonable but why do cruisers not care whether their are risking so much far from home by not even asking about these things?
    As for posts, ignore posts from “people” who only post touting one service and no general posts, ignore those which have glowing reports as their first and only posts, ignore posts that not give detailed verifiable reasons they are promoting a particular company. Ignore posts from single issue “experts” with thousands of posts most of which promote one cruise or one shore excursion operator, they are most certainly shills but they get a pass because they post so often for years. One has 6,000 posts and in every one of them they promote a single tour operator yet none of his posts are blocked. With each of these, the odds are very great that the post is fake and used in place of traditional advertising.

    This is how it is in this one specific region so you can imagine how widespread it is when the much larger sums of money are at stake with whole cruise lines or major destinations.

    Posted on June 20th, 2009 at 4:29 am

  27. Kiralık Daire Said,

    Very insightful article! Thanks for digging to find out more about this.

    I like to hear the good, the bad, and the truly ugly about cruise lines and I’ve come to expect that on message boards. You’ve reminded me that I’m being naive.

    Posted on June 20th, 2009 at 8:34 am

  28. Clubturk.net-2. Seo Yarışması – Kahrolsun İsrail zulmü Said,

    It puts Crusie Critic and The Travel Agents integrity into question.

    Posted on June 22nd, 2009 at 2:23 am

  29. perde Said,

    Why focus on the website where cruisers post? That’s a sideways approach. The sites where these “influencers” are posting has nothing to do with the marketing approach taken by Royal Caribbean.

    Let’s face it, I participate on three different cruise sites and none of them give two darn farts who I am when I register and don’t ask me if I “love” or “hate” any cruise line when I do.

    Posted on June 27th, 2009 at 11:50 am

  30. sicak video Said,

    A lot of Cruisers are very gullible and will join the bandwagon without asking any questions. They repeat the stories without thinking how little they know as to the identity of the poster or the destinations. On the web small tour providers can appear as large and established as an actual established operator. Here the key issue is licensing and insurance. As far as I know only 3 companies out of dozens hold internationally recognized liability insurance. Therefore only those 3 are eligible for bidding on cruise line contracts to provide the shore excursions the ships sell. They need a local operator to sponsor their passengers for visa free entry into the country.

    Posted on July 17th, 2009 at 7:29 am

  31. Commentary: Royal Champions walk the plank | www.expertcruiser.com Said,

    [...] March, I broke the story regarding Royal Caribbean International’s “Royal Champion” viral marketing program where fans of the cruise line only posted positive reviews on Cruise Critic and Trip Advisor. The [...]

    Posted on August 4th, 2009 at 2:04 pm

  32. PaulAquahound@aol.co Said,

    After reading through these responses, I have to say that several of you have missed the point, along with the author. These website bloggers existed long before the Royal Champions program was created. These were ordinary people who chatted on CruiseCritic with thousands of other people. Royal Caribbean recognized them as generally being supportive of their brand and dubbed them with the title “Royal Champions.” It is implied here that Royal Caribbean embedded these people with instruction to post positively about the cruise line. That is opposite of the truth. These people were in no way, shape, or form employees of Royal Caribbean. Heck, one of the Royal Champions was a 15 year old boy.

    Posted on August 22nd, 2009 at 6:37 pm

  33. Paul Said,

    One more error I’d like to point out is that these people did not only make positive posts about Royal Caribbean. Reading through their posting history, they complain just as much as they praise. I have read this author’s so-called “story” on several websites. Knowing the truth of how this program came to be, I can only imagine that she is a cheerleader for another cruise line (making her a hypocrite), or she doesn’t believe in seeking out the truth for a fair and balanced story. This is sensationalism at it’s best.

    Posted on August 23rd, 2009 at 10:30 am

  34. Tül Perde Said,

    Why do those who love cruising find themselves trashed on this site as “rabid cruise fans?” If the person running it isn’t a fan of cruising, then why is she an “expert cruiser?” I’m not a “rabid” fan of anything — “rabid” means disease-ridden and disease-causing. But people who like cruising as a vacation style aren’t any more deserving of being trashed than those who enjoy going to Nascar events over vacations, or to Broadway plays.

    Posted on September 23rd, 2009 at 9:42 am

  35. perde modelleri Said,

    Why do those who love cruising find themselves trashed on this site as “rabid cruise fans?” If the person running it isn’t a fan of cruising, then why is she an “expert cruiser?” I’m not a “rabid” fan of anything — “rabid” means disease-ridden and disease-causing. But people who like cruising as a vacation style aren’t any more deserving of being trashed than those who enjoy going to Nascar events over vacations, or to Broadway plays.

    Posted on November 12th, 2009 at 3:33 pm

  36. Kesari Tours Said,

    People generally use such type of methods for their profit and making others fool. These type of posts comes with the real fact behind the picture.
    Keep going on & thanks for showing all the real truth.

    Posted on April 7th, 2011 at 1:39 am

  37. Criminal Defense Lawyer Said,

    Unbelievable. Banned for life for leaving negative reviews… I might understand if they found the reviewer was employed by a competitor, who knows. Most likely they had good reason. Your article is an insightful look into this. Thanks for sharing.

    Posted on October 4th, 2011 at 10:43 pm

  38. peter mara Said,

    I think it is a good idea for people to be rewarded, if they have enjoyed the cruise, then tell people about it,my wife and i are going on our first cruise with Royal Caribbean, in fact its are first cruise ever, after friends told us how great it was. Looking foreward to meeting nice people, and not forgetting the staff. Peter Mara.

    Posted on October 16th, 2011 at 9:35 pm

  39. Brand Ambassadors as Champions ← CMGRclass Said,

    [...] move to understand online sentiment and potentially influence online conversation.  Others called foul, saying Royal Caribbean crossed the line by granting incentives in exchange for positive [...]

    Posted on April 17th, 2013 at 7:38 am


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